Things I never said

There is no thematic link in the following quotations, other than in my own mind. I don’t even necessarily agree with all the sentiments. I just think they were worth saying, and worth quoting.

——

We do not want merely to see beauty, though, God knows, even that is bounty enough. We want something else which can hardly be put into words – to be united with the beauty we see, to pass into it, to receive it into ourselves, to bathe in it, to become part of it.

C.S. Lewis

——

Science is great, but it’s low-yield. Most experiments fail. That doesn’t mean the challenge isn’t worth it, but we can’t expect every dollar to turn a positive result. Most of the things you try don’t work out — that’s just the nature of the process.

Ferric Fang, Washington-based microbiologist.

——

The collapse of communism created many a fine businessman. If you have spent your life analysing the crimes of capitalism there could not be a better apprenticeship for becoming one.

Doris Lessing.

——

Both religion and humanism have naively conspired to destroy the essence of spiritual work. The strategy of the religionist is to amplify and validate the authenticity of their mythology. The strategy of the humanist functions by psychologizing everything it touches, converting every sacred thing into a form of narcissistic ‘self-discovery’. In the purest sense, both approaches are completely bounded within a reductive and limiting conceptuality, and seem to have very little to do with actual awakening. It seems a far better thing to be free of both the psychological concerns of self and other as well as the fictions of religious mythology.

David Chaim Smith

——

Freedom is too fragile to put into words, so if you write down your rights and freedoms, you lose them.

George Jonas

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Force does not work the way its advocates seem to think it does. [Instead of impressing its victim, it reveals to him] the weakness, even the panic of his adversary and this revelation invests the victim with patience.

James Baldwin

——

It’s not that harming the biosphere will eventually catch up with us and hurt us from the outside. It’s that the biosphere is literally internal to us, a part of our very being, our compound individuality – harming the biosphere is internal suicide, not just some sort of external problem.

Ken Wilber

——

A rare experience of a moment at daybreak, when something in nature seems to reveal all consciousness, cannot be explained at noon. Yet it is part of the day’s unity.

Charles Ives

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